Community
Arrest Rates, by Race/Ethnicity, 2022

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Arrest Rates, by Race/Ethnicity, 2022

What does this measure?

The number of people arrested by race/ethnicity, expressed as a rate per 10,000 people of that race/ethnicity.

Why is this important?

Contact with the justice system is associated with a range of poor social and health outcomes. Some of these outcomes include damage to social networks, employment opportunities amd graduation rates, worsened mental health outcomes and increased risk for involvement in violence. Arrest rates are often used by law enforcement to evaluate the effectiveness of policing strategies and to track changes in crime rates over time.

How is our region performing?

In 2022, arrest rates in the Mid-Hudson Valley region, below the state (excluding NYC) were highest amongst Black or African Americans at 40 per 10,000 residents. This rate was followed by 20 per 10,000 for Hispanic residents 10 per 10,000 for White residents, and 4 per 10,000 for Asian residents. Arrest rates for all racial groups was highest in Greene (at 81 for Black residents, 33 for Hispanic residents, 21 for White residents, and 17 for Asian residents). Rates were lowest for Black, White and Asian residents in Putnam (29, 6, and 2 respectively) and lowest for Hispanics in Dutchess (15).

Why do these dispartities exist?

Disparities in adult arrests are the result of racialized stereotypes, policies and practices and community conditions. Stereotypes that portray Black and Latino people, especially males, as inherently dangerous, criminal, and violent lay the foundation for police surveillance and disparate and harsher treatment by the criminal justice system. Communities of color are more likely to be under surveillance and policies such as stop and frisk perpetuate increased police contact. Punitive drug laws have had disproportionate impact on Black and Latino communities. Even though Blacks and whites have similar rates of drug use, Black people are more likely to be arrested and experience harsher sentences. The concentration of Black and Latino communities in highly segregated communities with limited economic opportunities and ineffective schools may also foster crime involvement.

Notes about the data

Comparable national data were not available.

Arrest Rates, by Race/Ethnicity, 2022
AsianBlack or African AmericanHispanic or LatinoWhite
Region4402010
Columbia3802612
Dutchess328158
Greene17813321
Orange439218
Putnam229196
Sullivan9482215
Ulster6622614
NYS (excluding NYC)4431710

Source: New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services
Notes: Per 10,000 Residents




Number of Arrests, by Race/Ethnicity, 2022
AsianBlack or African AmericanHispanic or LatinoWhite
Region1364,1243,8038,722
Columbia416486627
Dutchess358736171,685
Greene9203104889
Orange461,7831,8642,246
Putnam598313464
Sullivan14315302864
Ulster236885171,947
NYS (excluding NYC)1,94143,94923,63081,340

Source: New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services




Arrest Rates, by Race/Ethnicity, 2022
AsianBlack or African AmericanHispanic or LatinoWhite
Region4402010
Columbia3802612
Dutchess328158
Greene17813321
Orange439218
Putnam229196
Sullivan9482215
Ulster6622614
NYS (excluding NYC)4431710

Source: New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services
Notes: Per 10,000 Residents




Number of Arrests, by Race/Ethnicity, 2022
AsianBlack or African AmericanHispanic or LatinoWhite
Region1364,1243,8038,722
Columbia416486627
Dutchess358736171,685
Greene9203104889
Orange461,7831,8642,246
Putnam598313464
Sullivan14315302864
Ulster236885171,947
NYS (excluding NYC)1,94143,94923,63081,340

Source: New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services




INDICATORS TREND | STATE
Children Living in Poverty Increasing
Children Living in Poverty, by Race/Ethnicity Not Applicable
Single-Parent Families Increasing
Single-Parent Families, by Race/Ethnicity Not Applicable
Rate of Child Abuse and Neglect Decreasing
Rate of Foster Care Admissions Decreasing
Teen Pregnancy Decreasing
Voter Registration Rate Increasing
Voter Participation Rate Decreasing
Total Population Increasing
Population by Age Not Applicable
Population by Race/Ethnicity Not Applicable
Household Types Not Applicable
Change in Total Jobs Increasing
Foreign-Born Population Increasing
Employment by Sector Not Applicable
Spending for County Government Increasing
Tourism Revenue Increasing
Preschoolers Receiving Special Education Services Increasing
Prekindergarten Participation Increasing
Students Receiving Special Education Services Increasing
Per-Student Spending Increasing
Student Performance on Grade 4 English, by Economic Background Not Applicable
Student Performance on Grade 4 English, by Race/Ethnicity Not Applicable
Student Performance on Grade 4 Math, by Economic Background Not Applicable
Student Performance on Grade 4 Math, by Race/Ethnicity Not Applicable
High School Cohort Graduation Rate Increasing
High School Cohort Dropout Rate Decreasing
High School GED Rate Maintaining
Education Levels of Adults Not Applicable
Education Levels of Adults, by Race/Ethnicity Not Applicable
Median Household Income Increasing
Median Household Income, by Race/Ethnicity Not Applicable
People Living in Poverty Maintaining
People Living in Poverty, by Race/Ethnicity Not Applicable
Seniors Living in Poverty Increasing
Veterans Living in Poverty Maintaining
Children Receiving Subsidized Child Care Decreasing
Students Eligible for Free/Reduced Price Lunch Increasing
Earned Income Tax Credit Participation Increasing
People Without Health Insurance Decreasing
Deaths from Drug Overdoses Increasing
Early Prenatal Care, by Mother's Race/Ethnicity Not Applicable
Living Wage Rate by Household Type Not Applicable
Income in Relation to Poverty Level Not Applicable
Babies with Low Birth Weights Maintaining
Households Receiving SNAP Maintaining
Food Insecurity Decreasing
People Living wth HIV Increasing
Mental Health Clinic Visits Increasing
Homeownership Rates Maintaining
Newly Diagnosed Cases of HIV Decreasing
Homeless Persons Decreasing
Cost of Homeownership Maintaining
Cost of Renting Increasing
Violent Crimes Decreasing
Homeownership Rates, by Race/Ethnicity Not Applicable
Domestic Violence Decreasing
Cost of Rent, by Race/Ethnicity Not Applicable
Arrest Rates, by Race/Ethnicity Not Applicable
Incarceration Rates, by Race/Ethnicity Not Applicable


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